Trellis Blog - Legal Analytics

Employment Discrimination and the Push to California Courts

Aug 8, 2019 11:14:00 AM / by Caitlin Davis posted in state law, statistics, Senate Bill 188, employment discrimination, discrimination

A new law will go into effect across California on January 1, 2020. California Senate Bill 188 revises the definition of race articulated in the Fair Employment and Housing Act (1959). This definition will now include hair texture and protective hairstyles—traits historically associated with race.
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The Medical Malpractice Crisis: Urban Legend or True Story?

Jul 24, 2019 4:13:28 PM / by Caitlin Davis posted in california, legal analytics, Superior Court, state law, statistics, medical malpractice

  “What’s happening all across this country is that lawyers are filing baseless suits against hospitals and doctors,” began George W. Bush to a room filled with medical professionals and industry allies. “That’s just a plain fact. And they’re doing it for a simple reason. They know the medical liability system is tilted in their favor. Jury awards in medical liability cases have skyrocketed in recent years.” In this story, lawyers and plaintiffs are not the only ones to blame. There is also the civil jury, the panel of peers that always sides with the plaintiff, that always awards excessive damages. But is this the case? Is there really a medical malpractice crisis?
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The Most Common Legal Cases in California

Jun 12, 2019 11:02:00 AM / by Tony Depa posted in california, litigation, decisions, motion, state court, statistics

  Statistics are essential when it comes to establishing legal precedent and the likelihood of success in your motions or cases. For this article, we’ve created a list of some of the most popular cases on the Trellis platform.
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French Drama: Say Goodbye to Judicial Analytics

Jun 4, 2019 2:19:07 PM / by Caitlin Davis posted in france, statistics, public access to court records

  As the legal tech sector intensifies its global expansion, governments around the world are grappling with ethical, technical, and political questions about public access to electronic court records. The digitization of these records has allowed artificial intelligence and machine learning companies to collect this public data, synthesizing it in ways that allow them to model how individual judges rule on particular types of matters.
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